Culinary World

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One of the great benefits of a summer vacation is to combine a culinary experience with a ‘primo’ summer spot. I have been longing to take the perfect road trip and find the James Beard award winning chef, Melissa Kelly in Rockland, Maine. Down the road from Bowdoin College and past numerous outdoor shops selling colorful canoes, one comes upon Primo Restaurant perched above Rockland’s harbor nestled in acres of organic vegetable bliss.

Melissa Kelly

And of course, there you will find Melissa Kelly, a native of Long Island, NY and the wunderkind that dreamt all this up.  Retreating to Maine from Old Chatham Sheepherding Company Inn in the Hudson Valley, NY (where she earned her first James Beard Award in 1999), Kelly opened Primo in 2000, on a 4.5 acre farm. And there she defies the short growing season with a truly farm to table restaurant. In fact, we have to give her credit that she was doing the farm to table thing before it was called that or became the standard tag for a country restaurant.

I ate the most delicious salad, perfectly fresh swordfish and a berry-licious dessert. My companions devoured lobsters. After the meal we were allowed back in the kitchen and were given a tour by Chef herself. How impressive. I didn’t realize that not only does she raise her own chickens, but slaughters them too. There are few chefs that know how to slaughter a chicken! Melissa also made us tour her basement…actually it’s her modern day prosciutto curing cellar!  The hams hung side by side. Premiums bits with lesser cuts. Nothing, of course, is wasted.

I think a novel could be written about Melissa. The purity of her spirit, the level of innovation and the pure deliciousness of her food, makes her a heroine for me. It’s worth a trip. So make your vacation mantra: “Rockland Maine next year!”

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At the ICC we have a lot of talented people….and many are our students. Want to have fun for the next few minutes and feel like a 2 minute trip to the Caribbean? Check out this video of our Professional Pastry Arts students creating an aquatic-themed sugar showpiece. You’ll feel transported!

Happy Summer!

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As many of you know, I am obsessed with the Fourchu lobsters. They taste like the sea and are so sweet. The ICC’s restaurant, L’Ecole celebrates them for the mere two months they are available. So you better get to L’Ecole in June and July where these delicious crustaceans are making their yearly Soho visit.

In fact, we kicked off the season with Cape Breton Tourism who brought down two native born chefs, Ardon Moffard and Brooks Hart. They joined forces with none other than Master Chef Floyd Cardoz. Chefs Ardon and Brooks delivered ‘naked lobsters’ cooked to perfection while Chef Cardoz worked his personal magic on the Fourchus. Chef C is a huge fan of these crustaceans and was happy to put his light touch of spices on the unctuous sweet meat.

In addition the former Premier (Governor) of Nova Scotia and now CEO of the Gaelic College, Rodney MacDonald treated us to his fiddle and step dancing. Cape Breton has the highest number of fiddle players per capita in the world. Here are the highlights of the ceildh-party- we had at the ICC this month.

Colin MacDonald (guitar) and Rodney MacDonald (fiddle)

Finally, Cape Breton is definitely travel destination, just look at these accolades from renowned publications and travel sites. And I promise if you ever get a chance to visit, you won’t be disappointed!

  • Top Ten Dare to Go, CNN.com 2014
  • Cape Breton Island one of the 20 Must See Places for 2013, National Geographic Traveler, World Edition
  • #1 Island Destination in North America, #3 in the World, Travel & Leisure, 2011
  • Most Romantic Place in Canada, Vacay.ca, 2012
  • Ten Best Island Holiday Destinations in Canada, Where.ca, 2011
  • Cabot Trail named #9 Cycling Destination in the world, Lonely Planet, 2011
  • Louisbourg voted #2 World’s Most Exceptional Castle Towns, msnbc.com, 2011
  • World’s Best Islands, BBC Travel, 2011
  • One of North Ameria’s Most Charming Fall Islands, Fox News, 2011
  • Cape Breton Highlands National Park, #2 Park in North America, National Geographic Traveler, 2006
  • Cape Breton Island one of Seven International Paradises, Fodor’s Online Travel Guide, 2008

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Photo: NYIOOC

Once again the ICC hosted the NY International Olive Oil competition. In my opening remarks, I observed that after last year’s conference I felt ashamed. Ashamed I knew so little about an ingredient that I am so in love with, passionate about and spend a fortune on. As an educator I feel I need to be part of the solution to change the common ignorance about tasting an exquisite olive oil. The statistics are a bit startling. Only .2 of 1% of olive oil is extra virgin. It is mostly made by artisans who harvest by hand, crush and bottle. In the villages where this is done the oil already needs to sell for 8 Euros a bottle. By the time it crosses the Atlantic, properly handled and put on a grocery shelf, the price is at least $20!

L: Curtis Cord, President-NYIOOC; Steve Jenkins-Fairway; Liz Tagami, President-Tagami International; Photos: NYIOCC

John Akeson, Deoleo; attendees; Photos: NYIOOC

And no two oils are alike. Similar to wine. The difference between a mediocre and a great olive oil is night and day. The flavor profile, the slight peppery burn, the mellowness allows a personality that is not afforded to many products. Freshness is so key that some people argue that you should only eat Northern hemisphere oil in the summer (since it is harvested and ground in December) or the Southern hemisphere in the winter (for the obvious correlation).

Photos: NYIOOC

Photo: NYIOOC

Photos: NYIOOC

Have you taken your olive oil as seriously as your wine? You should. The education is similar. I say to people who want to study wine that the best teacher is pulling corks, and think about the wine as you drink it. The same holds true for the olive oil taster. Unscrew those tops! Buy the expensive bottles. Don’t cook with them but drizzle the liquid gold on bread, raw vegetables, grilled fish and vegetables and be ready to smile. Fat is what gives you the feeling of satisfaction in your mouth. Nothing does that better than olive oil. It is the nectar of the gods. Greeks and Romans obviously had refined palates!

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I wanted to share with my readers this link from AltelierSlice.com authored by Jan Aman , whom I met through FCI alum Savinien Caracostea. I thought everyone should hear about the marvelous, momentous (and well deserved) surprise dinner thrown for another FCI/ICC alum Wylie Dufresne of WD-50 and Alder. This extraordinary dinner was one for the ages and will be referred to and talked about for years to come!

http://atelierslice.com/the-re-invented-avant-garde-28-chefs-of-gelinaz-coming-together-at-wd-50-on-april-8-2014/

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The most magical chef lives in a magical valley and creates magical food. His name is Erez Komarovsky. He lives in a valley in Israel snug up to the Lebanese border and works his fires so well you can believe he is the Sorcerer of Food. My good friends Doron and Marianne made sure that on my trip to Israel I was able to meet with this wondrous chef. His home is nestled on a hill. As you walk down the winding path there are whimsical sculptures, wild bushes and cultivated flowers. Jumbled beautifully just as though nature dictated it so.

As you come upon the house there is a wood burning stove right by the front door. The smells smack you in the face. A small vintage mobile oven owned by Erez’s grandmother sits proudly nearby (he still sometimes uses it).

And then you walk into the house with views that go for miles and smells that make you giddy. We were greeted with fabulous unlabeled, unreleased champagnes (they were actually made by Yarden). They were left on the lees and had such depth, fine bubbles and elegance. I felt I was drinking a grand cru! I was in heaven.

Then the parade of food came out. Erez is well known all over the world for being an excellent bread baker. His food is natural. And distinctive. It is Erez. His hummus is made from black beans, not chickpeas. His roasted radishes, blackened by the fire were jewels glistening with the freshest olive oil. With his hands he mushed lamb tartar…he also diced it and asked…which do you like better? Definitely, the mushed. He smiled and said, ‘of course.’

Sorry I can’t tell you where this Israeli Brigadoon is, but savor the photos! I really love what I do…..

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