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I saw the future in Newark, New Jersey. It was green. Really green. No GMOS, no pesticides and it was delicious. Aero Farms is a high-tech farm that has been working for a few years now. It not only is growing beyond it’s million pounds of greens, but is inspiring the community. In fact it has donated a small farm apparatus to the local charter school Phillips Academy. The academy has an amazing school kitchen program and a roof top garden. I was pleasantly surprised to meet one of ICC’s graduates there, Robert Wallauer, who is their chef and Food Service Director.  The program itself is run by Ecospaces Education, lead by the dynamic Program Director Frank Mentesana. It is no wonder that Michelle Obama chose the school last month to visit!

Robert Wallauer and Frank Mentesana

Now what really makes these greens exciting is that with lighting and patented growing medium technologies Aero Farm is making tenderer and exquisitely delicious greens. I for one, never hopped on the kale bandwagon but the baby kale I tasted in Newark was so tender, with a flavor that screamed out for a touch of lemon and a drizzle of olive oil that I instantly became a fan. The micro watercress as crunchy, refreshing and I popped like candy.

For us gardeners to hear that seeds germinate and grow in a matter of days, not weeks is nothing short of miraculous. Now, you might say you are committed to the earth and soil grown greens. As a lifelong gardener, I would have said that too until I think now of the plight of the world.

We have 8 million people living in NYC alone. We want them to eat fresh produce every day. In an ideal nutritious world that is 58 million servings a week. The land around NYC is developed and the few open spaces are too expensive for farming. If we are serious about fresh produce we need to look to the underdeveloped suburbs around our cities.
Aero Farms is leading the way. And I am fully on board that bandwagon!

A big shout out to Mark Oshima and the Aero Farm team for inviting me to Newark. They are changing the world.

Marc Oshima

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Dumpster Dive Salad

He’s done it again. Dan Barber never ceases to thrill, challenge and inspire me as a diner. This time he really topped himself. As you may know, Dan is one of the most responsibly sustainable chefs in the world. He is always questioning how we can be more responsible stewards of the earth. This new iteration has a simple formula: Make a meal out of scraps. And so he did.

Coppa

Broken Razor Clams and pig's ear vinaigrette

Now, some were his scraps, but most were purchased from the food vendors that Dan works with for his normal menus. He did not want free scraps but wanted to teach the vendors that scraps have value. He has pushed the needle so far again.

Veggie Pulp Burger, Spent Grains Bread

Skate Wings, Monkfsh Wings

Beef Tallow Candle

Leftover Brown Rice and Broccoli

Discarded Greens with Aged Beef Rib Broth

Cocoa Husk Sorbet, Chocolate with Almond Pulp

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Firstly, let me apologize for such a lull in blog posts. As President of the Friends of USA Pavilion at EXPO Milano 2015, I have had my hands full. The Pavilion is so exciting that I just have share the developments. For those of you who might not be familiar with EXPO Milano 2015, there will be a World’s Fair (EXPO) in Milan from May 2015 through October 31 2015. Six months of wonder.

USA Pavilion rendering James Biber Architects

The theme is “Feeding the Planet; Energy for Life.” Over 140 countries will participate. We have all been challenged with the daunting task of how we will responsibly feed the planet when our population explodes to 9 billion people. If we continue to produce, consume and waste food at our present rate, we will not only not have enough food but won’t have enough energy to produce the food. Climate change and dwindling natural resources like fresh water also will add to the dilemma. Each participating country will take a stab at demonstrating how to meet and solve these challenges.

The USA Pavilion theme, American Food 2.0 will highlight some of our greatest thinkers on the subject. ICC’s grad Dan Barber will speak to his Third Plate, and Dean Cesare Casella will be cooking at the JBF House Milano. Architect Jim Biber of Biber Architects has designed  a beautiful and transformative building: it is a true vertical farm. Thinc, the exhibits firm that designed and programmed the 9/11 Museum, will be designing our exhibits.

Harvesting the vertical farm, rendering James Biber Architects

The USA Pavilion will be three floors. The roof will serve as a bar/garden and communal meeting place. The middle floor is a boardwalk, boardwalks have historically been an avenues of food and community, and fun too! We were able to purchase the actual Coney Island boardwalk after Hurricane Sandy. That floor will have exciting stations speaking to the pressing issues, highlighting various points of view on how to solve them and introduce American personalities and institutions that will play key roles in solving the problems. The ground floor will be a visual delight of the great American foodscape from barbecue to immigrant food to Thanksgiving dinner.

Whew! If you are at all interested in food and the future, you must plan on visiting. This World’s Fair will be a benchmark in the history of EXPOs and will rival the best. We at ICC are proud and honored to be a part of it. Please visit USA Pavilion:American Food 2.0 website for information, social media and updates.

Roof Deck rendering James Biber Architects

A warm human touch will be the 120 student ambassadors who will serve as guides and docents. They will be bi-lingual and speak a polyglot of languages. These students are being recruited from colleges all over the country and trained by the University of Southern California.

We will also have a space across from our Pavilion that will contain food trucks. We will be showcasing American food in its diversity and deliciousness. Everything from lobster rolls to fried clams. Hamburgers to tacos. We want to bring the great bounty of American regionalism to our Pavilion and introduce the 25-30 million EXPO visitors to the real deliciousness of American cuisine.

Outside the walls of the Pavilion and the EXPO itself, we will infuse a bit of the States in the city of Milan itself. The Mayor of Milan, Guiliano Pisapia  graciously visited the ICC and is excited to welcome us to his city to showcase our top chefs and to liven the piazzas around the city with American outdoor eating events. Tailgating anyone? Also in the city we will hold TED-like talks (Beard Chats) and panel discussions to hear from a myriad of experts on the various ways we can overcome the big issues. Last but not least, we will run a James Beard House in central Milan and showcase the best and brightest chefs from the USA.

Scenes from December Milan and site visit, with Amb Reeker and, at the site with Mitchell Davis

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At the ICC we have a lot of talented people….and many are our students. Want to have fun for the next few minutes and feel like a 2 minute trip to the Caribbean? Check out this video of our Professional Pastry Arts students creating an aquatic-themed sugar showpiece. You’ll feel transported!

Happy Summer!

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I am proud to share with you that The International Culinary Center and the James Beard Foundation along with the American Chamber of Commerce in Italy have been selected as presenters for the U.S.A. Pavilion at the Expo Milano 2015. The ICC will play a pivotal role and I  have been greatly honored to be appointed as the President of the U.S.A. Pavilion.  The theme of the EXPO is “Feeding the Planet, Energy for Life”. Our program, aptly named “American Food 2.0″ will work to represent to the world five core values of American cuisine that the ICC and the James Beard Foundation represent….deliciousness, responsibility, innovation, diversity and entrepreneurism.   Below are a few renderings fo the Pavilion and also of our team at press conference in Milan.

Pavilion Front View James Biber Architects

Pavilion Rear View James Biber Architects

Pavilion Aerial View James Biber Architects

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Cultural Asset, Nyeon-im Kim, Dorothy

So why can’t the U.S. Government have designations like “Intangible Cultural Asset?” I actually met one on my recent trip to Korea. As most foodies have read and some have been lucky enough to taste, Korean cuisine is different, delicious and comforting. One of their most iconic dishes, is bibimbap.

Bibimbap

Jeonju Univesity students

On my recent trip I was invited to speak at Jeonju University which is about 3 hours south of Seoul. Jeonju is the culinary heart of Korea (similar to Lyon in France). The university has a much respected hospitality program and the town is a food mecca. Right before I gave my lecture and met the wonderful and welcoming students, we needed to tuck into lunch. That is when I met the Intangible Cultural Asset and Master of Traditional Korean food, Ms. Nyeon-im Kim. So unassuming and so dynamic, she’s in her seventies and still gets up every morning to oversee her restaurant, Gajok Hwegwan. The restaurant is touted outside with a large sign saying that this where you will find “the intangible cultural asset.” Then you enter a corner stairwell walking up two flights above a CVS type store. There on the second floor landing is an entrance lobby stacked with an array of fermenting bottles. You turn a corner and you think half of Korea is having lunch. The packed restaurant is within arms distance of a room length kitchen.  She oversees about half a dozen cooks lining up the feasts. Waitresses are buzzing back and forth.

Old Fashioned Fermentation

We were greeted in a private room by two professors from Jeonju. J.C. is one of ICC’s culinary graduates. They were so excited to have me taste Ms. Kim’s exceptional cooking. Not only did we eat the outstanding bibimbap but I had an incredible soufflé, that was more eggy than the traditional French version and had a slight fishy, acidic bite. Believe me, it was good.

The souffle

Roasted Rice Soup

When Koreans eat, they put all the plates on the table at once. It’s a bit overwhelming at first, but I got to really like it. You just feel like you pulled up a chair to a buffet table and could then concentrate on your conversation with people at your table.My favorite sound in a Korean restaurant? All the laughter. No waiters interrupt the punch lines! I’d also like to share two final photos of meals with friends, one with our wonderful host for the visit, Rose Hyejung Han, the CEO of DreamVille Entertainment, and her colleague Ethan Woo, who was our indispensable liaison.

Front: Rose Hyejung Han, Dorothy Back: Jin-A Cha, Associate Professor, Department of Traditional Food Culture, Jeonju University, Jung Soon Kim, ICC Alumna and Associate Professor of Wester Cuisine, Jeonju University

Our liaison Sung Bong "Ethan"-Woo of DreamVille Entertainment and The ICC's Assistant Dean of Student Affairs/International Student Adviser Leland Scruby

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